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The camera original was shot on 35mm film stock which was then converted to digital information. The work is primarily composed of three repeating shots. Each image shows a two year old boy smoking a cigarette, either in mid-shot or close-up. He sucks on the cigarette as its tip glows, parts his lips inhaling the smoke deeply into his lungs, and blows a perfectly shaped, billowing smoke ring at the viewer. Within twenty seconds of repetitive action, smoke fills the entire frame, providing the point at which the event loops. This twenty second loop is in ti mate, inviting and sensual despite the incendiary subject matter. The child invites the viewer s gaze and returns it unequivocally in what appears to be a disconcerting endorsement of corruption.
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10,000 Frames is just that. Marshall traveled with her two sons from the UK to Disney World. Over the course of six days, Marshall and the boys were photographed using Super 8 film. In the hectic finished piece, 10,000 frames are played as if on fast-forward for six minutes and forty seconds. Marshall narrates as they tour through the park, eat innumerable meals and shop, before arriving back at their doorstep.
Lollipop, the show s centerpiece, is a spaghetti Western in 6 and one half seconds. Marshall digitally looped a brief camera movement, beautifully shot on 35mm film and, in so doing, both trumps and parodies her previous work. Set to a mesmerizing score by Damon Albarn, the piece pays homage to both Sergio Leone and Clint Eastwood s man-with-no-name persona. The subject is, again, one of Marshall s boys, in this case wearing tan make-up, and painted on stubble, sucking on a lollipop. The wide-screen matting, the ominous music, the intensity of the boy s gaze, and the sheer invisibility of the loop combine to create a powerfully contemplative object.


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